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Adaptation

Shares of woodland area also vary considerably at local level.

Source: Forest Research,  Department of Agriculture, Environment & Rural Affairs,  Office for National Statistics

The area of woodland in the UK shows that Scotland has 19%, Wales has 15%, England has 10% and Northern Ireland has 9%.

Woodland is defined in UK forestry statistics as land under stands of trees with a minimum area of 0.5 hectares (0.1 hectares in Northern Ireland) and canopy cover of at least 20%, or having the potential to achieve this.

The definition relates to land use, rather than land cover, so integral open space and felled areas that are awaiting restocking are included as woodland.

Source: Forest Research

  1. The year is for the year to March.

In the 1980s, 5% of new woodland were broadleaf but this has risen to more than 80% between 2005 and 2010.

Over the last 45 years, the type of new trees planted has changed. In the mid-1980s, around 5% of new woodland creation was broadleaf, rising to more than 80% between 2005 and 2010. In the last five years (2017 to 2021), 40-45% of new woodland planting was broadleaf. New woodland refers to areas of land that were not previously woodland.

Source: Forest Research

  1. The year is for the year to March.

The presence, abundance and diversity of species are key factors in determining the resilience of ecosystems to environmental changes, including climate change and disease, and the maintenance of ecosystem services.

Source: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs

  1. Geographical Area: England - Unit of Measurement: Index (1980 = 100)

  2. This composite measure of distribution includes 148 wild bee and 229 hoverfly species; the total number of species included in the index can vary between years and hence this indicator may not be directly comparable to those appearing in previous publications. The dotted lines on the graph represents the 90% credible interval (measure of uncertainty) for the unsmoothed trend (solid line).

All of the UK nations has shown a decrease in water leakage betweem 2007-2008 and 2019-20. Supporting Ofwat’s ambitions on leakage, minimising the amount of water lost through leakage year on year, with water companies expected to reduce leakage by at least an average of 15% by 2025

Source: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs,  Welsh Water,  Scottish Water,  Northern Ireland Water

  1. Data are presented as a 3-year moving average, with year on chart the final year of the 3-year average.

  2. Data are only available for the 3-year average for all four countries from 2007/08.

  3. Data for Wales sourced from Welsh Water annual reports, data for Northern Ireland from Northern Ireland Water annual reports, data for Scotland from Scottish Water and data for England from DEFRA’s Outcome Indicator Framework for the 25 Year Environment Plan.

Only 3% of new EPCs were recorded in the energy efficient rates of A or B with D rating accounting for 42% in 2020.

Certificates lodged on the Energy Performance of Buildings Registers since 2008, including average energy efficiency ratings, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions, fuel costs, average floor area sizes and numbers of certificates recorded. Energy Performance Certificates gives homes a rating from A being the most efficient to G being the least efficient.

Source: Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government

There were 89% of new buildings allocated to A or B energy efficiency rating in 2020.

New dwellings cover new builds as well as conversions and change of use of existing properties (i.e. converting a house into self-contained flats or changing a church into a dwelling). Energy Performance Certificates gives homes a rating from A being the most efficient to G being the least efficient.

The energy efficiency rating is a measure of the overall efficiency of a building. This rating is based on the performance of the building and its fixed services (such as heating and lighting). The higher the rating the more energy efficient the home is and the lower the fuel bills will be.

Source: Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government